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June 5, 2013 / compassioninpolitics

Timothy Prestero–Design for People, Not Awards at TED x Boston

Here is a summary of the core components of Timothy Prestero’s talk at TEDxBoston. (its about 11 minutes long):

• Donations of old tech can quickly turn into junk

• Human centered design–What people want + actually works.

• Michael Free at Pass “Who will chose, us and pay the dues” ****

• What is your business & who is your customer.

• Who is making the decision (***) Manufacturers? Agencies?

• Fish where the fish are.

• Design for outcomes = Design for manufacturing & distribution. •••

• East meets west model.

• Design for actual use. No such thing as a dumb user.

• Design for manufacturing & distribution.

• Appearances matter. (at least for hospital tech)

• Make is easy to use the right way (???)

Are we designing for:
• the world we want?
• the world as it is?
• Or the world that is to come?

Design for outcomes = Design that matters

Lessons Learned:
1) Design for inspiration is not enough.
2) Iterative user and field testing
3) Collaboration with key organizations
4) Think in systems. Design for manufacturing & distribution.
5) Ask questions. Question assumptions. Get feedback.

I took notes on another key design for development or design for the other 90 percent talk by Paul Polak. You can read those notes here (by the way, Paul’s team cross-posted this on his Facebook page.) You can read other posts about Design for the Other 90 Percent here.

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