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April 2, 2012 / compassioninpolitics

Quotes on Experiential Learning from Shop Class as Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work

“Any discipline that deals with authoritative, independent reality requires honesty and humility…If we fail to respond appropriately to these authoritative realities, we remain idiots. If we succeed, we experience the pleasure that comes with progressively more acute vision, and the growing sense that our actions are fitting or just, as we bring them into conformity with that vision. This conformity is achieved in an iterated back-and-forth between seeing and doing. Our vision is improved by acting, as this brings any defect in our perception to vivid awareness.”

“Anything which alters conciousness in the direction of unselfishness, objectivity and realism is to be connected with virtue…Virtue is the attempt to pierce the veil of selfish conciousness and join the world as it really is…not to escape the world but to join it, and this exhilarates us because of the distance between our ordinary dulled consciousness and an apprehension of the real.”
Iris Murdoch, quoted in Shopclass as Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work

“The metaphysician often takes a dim view of economic exchange. It is the realm of mere agreement and conventional values, rather than intrinsic qualities. But agreement and convention, if consulted, provide a helpful check on your own subjectivity-they offer proof that you are not insane, or at least a more robust presuption to that effect. Some of us need such proof more than others, and getting paid for what you love to do can provide it.”

“We find no correlation at all between your degree result and how well you get on in this company.”
Recruiter quoted by Phillip Brown and Richard Scase in Higher Education and Corporate Realities

“Managers need to become anthropologists. But above all they needed to become founders of cultures, like a Moses, Jesus, or Muhammad.” (p. 149)

* Despite what might be implied by the title, this is not about faith as much as meaning.

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