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November 8, 2015 / compassioninpolitics

Famous Scientists Quotes on Christianity, Religion, God, and Science

I think both science and religion are necessary to understand our relation to the Universe.  In principle, Science tells us how
everything works, although there are many unsolved problems and I guess there alays will be. But science raises questions that it can never answer. Why did the big bang eventually lead to conscious beings who question the purpose of life and the existence of the Universe? This is where religion is necessary.” (Hewish 2002a)
Antony Hewish (born 1924) received the 1974 Nobel Prize in Physics for his discovery of pulsars
Ph.D. in physics, Cambridge University, 1952
“God certainly seems to be a rational Creator. That the entire terrestrial world is made from electrons, protons and neutrons and that a vacuum is filled with virtual particles demands incredible rationality.”
(Hewish 2002b)
“For modern man, the only rule of conduct is his own good pleasure. Every one is enclosed in his own egoism like the crab in its shell and, again like the crab, seeks to devour his neighbor.”
” (Carrel 1952, Chap. 1, Part 1).
Alexis Carrel (1873–1944) won the 1912 Nobel Prize in Medicine and Physiology “for his work on vascular suturing and the transplantation of blood-vessels and organs.”  Carrel single-handedly created the method for transplanting organs from one human body to the other. He is the founder of modern transplantology
Researcher at the University of Chicago and the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research, NY; Professor at the University of Lyons, France
“I am constrained to attribute the uniqueness of the Self or Soul to a supernatural spiritual creation. To give the explanation in theological terms: each Soul is a new Divine creation which is implanted into the growing foetus at some time between conception and birth.”
(Eccles 1991, 237).
“I regard this theory as being without foundation. The more we discover scientifically about the brain the more clearly do we distinguish between the brain events and the mental phenomena and the more wonderful do the mental phenomena become. Promissory materialism is simply a superstition held by dogmatic materialists. It has all the features of a Messianic prophecy
, with the promise of a future freed of all problems – a kind of Nirvana for our unfortunate successors.”
(Eccles 1994).
“I consider the power to believe to be one of the great divine gifts to man through which he is allowed in some inexplicable manner to come near to the mysteries of the Universe without understanding them. The capability to believe is as characteristic and as essential a property of the human mind as is its power of logical reasoning, and far from being incompatible with the scientific approach, it complements it and helps the human mind to integrate the world into an ethical and meaningful whole.
There are many ways in which people are made aware of their power to believe in the supremacy of Divine guidance and power: through music or visual art, some event or experience decisively influencing their life, looking through a microscope or telescope, or just b y looking at the miraculous manifestations or purposefulness of Nature.”
(Chain, as cited in Clark 1985, 143).
We do not need to be expert zoologists, anatomists or physiologists to recognise that there exist some similarities between apes and man, but surely we are much more interested in the differences than the similarities. Apes, after all, unlike man, have not produced great prophets, philosophers, mathematicians, writers, poets, composers, painters and scientists.  They are not inspired by the divine spark which manifests itself so evidently in the spiritual creation of man and which differentiates man from animals.”
(Chain 1971, 368).
“When it comes to the origin of life there are only two possibilities: creation or spontaneous generation. There is no third way. Spontaneous generation was disproved one hundred years ago, but that leads us to only one other conclusion, that of supernatural creation. We cannot accept that on philosophical grounds; therefore, we choose to believe the impossible: that
life arose spontaneously by chance!”
(George Wald, 1954, “The Origin of Life,” Scientific American, 191 [2]: 48)
* He was actually still an atheist when he said this and I believe he ended up being a deist, but certainly a profoundly paradigm shattering quote.
“There continue to be very deep epistemological questions about the significance of sharp scientific laws like the laws of quantum mechanics and the laws that govern the nature of chaos. Both of these fields have irreversibly shaken the 18th and 19th centuries’ purely deterministic, mechanistic view of the world.”
In any case there’s a sense of a world that to an amazing extent yields to our comprehension, but fundamentally remains incomprehensible. And because it is manifestly such a wonderful thing, it leads one – I follow here in Einstein’
s footsteps – to sense some Force that can take responsibility and credit for it.”
(Kohn 2001a)

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