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June 17, 2016 / compassioninpolitics

JP Moreland on Physicalism and Logical Positivism

“Second, several things exist and cannot be seen.  The great majority of thinkers in the history of Western thought have embraced one or more of these non-empirical entities: values, propositions, numbers, sets, persons, one’s own thoughts, the laws of logic.  For example, I know that my own thoughts exist, but I have never seen one of them.  But if I can believe in only what I can see, then I must deny the existence of my thoughts or tery to reduce them to physical entitites or observable behavior.  To date, all such reductions have failed, and the best explanation for my mental life is to embrace the existence of nonphysical entitites called thoughts which can be in my mind.  This history of philosophy is filled with the existence of non-physical entitities, and it has not sufficed in arguing against them to simply point out their non-empirical nature.  Such a strategy is question-begging.”

Professor of Philosophy at Biola University

JP Moreland, Scaling the Secular City, p. 226 to 227

“Sixth, it is often the case that we believe in the existence of things because we infer their existence to explain some group of facts.  In these cases, these entitites are believed to exist even if they cannot be seen even in principles.  For example, many theoretical entities of science are postulated even though one could never see them.  Magnetic fields are an example.  Another example is the existence of other minds.”

Professor of Philosophy at Biola University

JP Moreland, Scaling the Secular City, p. 227

Additional arguments:

Physicalism is self-refuting.

The opportunity cost of physicalism.

Additional examples of the non-physical.

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