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February 15, 2012 / compassioninpolitics

“Does the New Testament present a reliable portrait of the historical Jesus?”: Dr. Bart Ehrman and Dr. Craig Evans Debate

Here is the link to the second half of the debate on “Does the New Testament present a reliable portrait of the historical Jesus?”: Dr. Bart Ehrman and Dr. Craig Evans Debate

Dr. Craig Evans is

a biblical scholar and author. He earned his Bachelor of Arts in history and philosophy from Claremont McKenna College, a Master of Divinity from Western Baptist Seminary in Portland, Oregon, and his Master of Arts and Ph.D. in Biblical Studies from Claremont Graduate University in southern California. He is Payzant Distinguished Professor of New Testament and director of the graduate program at Acadia Divinity College in Wolfville, Nova Scotia.[1][2] Prior to coming to Acadia, he was a visiting assistant professor of religious studies at McMaster University and a professor of biblical studies at Trinity Western University.[2] Dr. Evans’ research has led to conferences on subjects including the Dead Sea Scrolls,[1] issues related to the image and perception of Jesus Christ[3] and archaeology of the Bible.[4] He writes extensively on the historical Jesus and the Jewish background of the New Testament era.

Dr. Bart Ehrman (an agnostic or atheist, I’m not honestly sure which)

American New Testament scholar, currently the James A. Gray Distinguished Professor of Religious Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Ehrman writes about the early Christians, using the term “proto-orthodox” to describe the Christian traditions that would later be defined as orthodox.[1] He describes 1st- and 2nd-century Christians as not yet having a unified, orthodox tradition.[1] He is the author of a number of books in this area, including Misquoting Jesus (2005), God’s Problem (2008), and Jesus, Interrupted (2009).

For more on the historical Jesus topic, I suggest checking out Craig Evans resource links. For a full list of his books you can refer here.

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